Find A Grave

December 15, 2009

Earlier this year, a fellow genealogist from Michigan told us about a useful site called Find A Grave.  Because I have found it to be such a help in my own research, I want to pass on the information to others.

In the words of its founder:

Find A Grave is a resource for finding the final resting place of family, friends, and ‘famous’ individuals. With millions of names and photos, it is an invaluable tool for the genealogist and family history buff. Find A Grave memorials can contain rich content including photos, biographies and dates.

Volunteers, such as my wife and myself, supply information and photos of graves and of the individual, if available.  One can do a search by name or by cemetery.  While most of the data base is of U.S. graves, the site is worldwide.  I encourage all genealogy researchers to visit this site and experience its ease of use and the value of its information.  You might find yourself volunteering a little of your time to take photographs for others or to “manage” your own virtual cemeteries.  Visit the site by going to findagrave.com.  Happy searching!

  Read the rest of this entry »


Are the Winegars Mayflower Descendants?

December 9, 2009

The Mayflower

In several of my earlier posts I have mentioned the research of my father, Donald Stephenson Winegar, who spent many of his retirement years doing genealogical research.  He labored in the years before computers and the internet, and, what today can be done almost instantly on the internet,  took him years.  In the case of Winegar Mayflower descendants, he was confident that we were descendants, but modern research leaves the issue very much in question.  In any case, what follows is a very interesting story, and it is very easy to find corroborating or refuting evidence on the internet for those who may be interested.

Deacon John Dunham (Denham) was born about 1589 in Scrobee, England.  He was among the group of Pilgrims who emigrated to Leiden, Holland.  He was married twice  and had children by both wives.  Dunham family records claim that he was wanted for treasonable activities in England, and, therefore, traveled to America on the Mayflower under the assumed name of John Goodman, a single man.  Goodman is reported to have died in the first winter and and, at some point, Dunham assumed his real name.  He was a prominent member of the Plymouth Colony and was appointed a Deacon in the church, a high honor in the Colony.

Most English settlers in the American Colonies kept excellent records, but the Plymouth Colony seems to be an exception.   Governor Bradford began writing the Plymouth Annals in 1630, ten years after the Mayflower arrived, and continued writing until 1641.  The first list of passengers did not appear until 1669, after the death of John Dunham.

Several experts report that the claim that Goodman and Dunham were the same man is completely unsupported and that Dunham probably arrived in the colony around 1632.  Those supporting the Goodman/Dunham claim of ancestry point out that there are problems if it is not true.  Goodman was granted a garden plot in 1623.  These plots were only granted to married men.  Dunham’s son John later received a special grant being one of the first born of the newcomers.  Deacon John’s daughter Abigail,  born in 1623, is reported to be the first child born in the new colony.  Dunham became a deacon in 1633, which would have been very unlikely for a newcomer. 

I do not intend to investigate this controversy.  For anyone interested in doing so, a Google search will provide abundant material.  Where do the Winegars fit in to this?  I believe that we are direct descendants of Deacon John Dunham.  Whether we are Mayflower descendants depends on answering the above question.  At any rate, we had ancestors that were in the Plymouth Colony very early in its existence.

The following traces our connection to John Dunham.

John Dunham/Susanna Kenny(John’s first wife)

Thomas Dunham/Sarah

Sarah Dunham/James Palmer

Sarah Palmer/Conrad Winans

William Winans/Sarah Hawley

Silas Winans/Elizabeth Howe

Elizabeth Winans/Ulrich Winegar   (This is Ulrich (5) born in 1783 the great-great-grandson of Ulrich (1) who brought the family to New York in 1710.

Ashbel Winegar/Mary Rease Roberts

Edwin Ashbel Winegar/Myrtie Stephenson

Donald Stephenson Winegar/ Mary Deone Daniells

Even if we are not direct descendents of the Mayflower, we do have another connection.  Ulrich Winegar (1) had a son Garrett.  Two of Garrett’s sons married sisters who were Mayflower descendants: Jacob Winegar/ Deliverence Doty and John Winegar/Elizabeth Doty.  According to Family Tree Maker, Elizabeth is the wife of my 4th grand-uncle.


Daniells/Plowman/Coleman Links to the Royalty of Europe

November 23, 2009

Betty Daniells

In several previous blogs, I have mentioned the work of my Aunt Betty Daniells in gathering genealogical information on our ancestors.  Betty spent her retirement years traveling in the U.S. and Europe, gathering data.  She did her work before the age of the computer, so everything was collected and recorded by hand.   Starting with her parents, she followed each line as far as she could.  One line, through Juliana Coleman, wife of Peter Plowman, was traced back to around 1400 where it was linked to the royalty of England.  The English have historically kept detailed ancestral records so that once a link is established, it is possible to connect dozens of generations.  Her research shows that the ancestors of the Daniells/Plowman/Coleman line includes Kings of England, France, Italy, Germany and Poland.  Our ancestors include Charlemagne, William the Conqueror, Alfred the Great, and numerous Counts, Dukes, Viscounts, and Earls.  Several of our ancestors signed the Magna Carta.  Lady Godiva is my 34th great-grandmother.

It is one thing to gather all of the data on European royalty; it is another matter entirely to display it.  Betty traced one line 76 generations to Mark Antony and at least six more lines 40 or more generations.  It was common practice in the Middle Ages for treaties between nations to include the marriage of one king’s daughter to the king’s new ally.  Lines crisscross and kings have children by multiple wives.  No standard genealogy chart handles all of this data.  One of Betty’s major accomplishments was to organize all of her data into a chart.  I have several rough drafts she made on long white window shades.  Eventually, she created a  copy where each couple’s names were typed on tabs which were attached to poster board and then laminated.  A picture of this chart, made in two pieces, is shown here.  Actually, there is a third piece which connects as an overlay.  I don’t know if anyone else has been able to create a chart displaying  this information, but I think this was a major accomplishment.  I think that Betty made a copy of this chart for each of her 11 nieces and nephews.

Betty Daniells' Ancestry Tree

I was recently able to have the chart scanned and anyone who would like a PDF copy can reach me through the comments section of this blog.


More Wit of W.C. Daniells

October 25, 2009
W.C. Daniells

W.C. Daniells

 

The following poem was not written by W.C. Daniells but was found among his other writings.  W.C. was a staunch Republican, and this poem reflects perfectly what his attitude was toward President Franklin Roosevelt.  The author is unknown.

 

 

REJECTED

A stranger stood at the gates of Hell,

And the Devil himself had answered the bell.

He looked him over from head to toe,

And said, “My Friend, I’d like to know

What you have done in the line of sin

To entitle you to come within?”

Then Franklin D. with his usual guile

Stepped forth and flashed his toothy smile.

“When I took charge in Thirty-three

A nation’s faith was mine,” said he.

I promised this and I promised that,

And I calmed them down with a Fireside chat,

I spent their money on fishing trips,

And fished from the decks of their Battleships,

I gave them jobs on the P.W.A.,

Then raised their taxes and took it away.

I raised their wages and closed their shops,

I killed their pigs and burned their crops.

I double-crossed both old and young,

And still, the fools, my praises sung.

I brought back beer, and what do you think?

I taxed it so high, they couldn’t drink.

I furnished money with Government loans,

When they missed a payment, I took their homes.

When I wanted to punish the folks, you know,

I put my wife on the radio.

I paid them to let their Farms lie still,

And imported Food Stuffs from Brazil.

I curtailed crops, when I felt real mean

And shipped in corn from Argentine.

When they’d start to worry, stew and fret,

I’d get them to chanting the Alphabet,

With A.A.A. and the C.C.C.

The W.P.A. and N.L.B.

With these many units, I got their goats,

And still, I crammed it down their throats.

My workers worked with the speed of snails,

While the taxpayers chewed their fingernails.

When the Organizers needed dough,

I closed the plants for the C.I.O.

I ruined jobs, and I ruined health,

And I put the screws on the rich man’s wealth.

And someone who couldn’t stand the gaff,

Would come to me, and how I’d laugh.

When they got too strong on certain things,

I’d pack and head for old Warm Springs.

I ruined their country, their homes and then

I placed the blame on Nine Old Men.

Now Franklin talked both long and loud,

And the Devil stood, and his head he bowed.

At last he said, “Let’s make it clear,

You’ll have to move, you can’t stay here;

For once you mingle with this mob,

I’ll have to hunt myself a job.”


Children of Will Carleton and Iva Bliss Daniells: Jean

October 24, 2009

The fifth and last of the children of Will Carleton and Iva Bliss Daniells was Jean.  Jean’s oldest son Jim Lowell writes: 

 

 

Jean Daniells Lowell

Jean Daniells Lowell

Iva Georgene “Jean” was born November 21, 1919 at the Pivot in Wacousta.  In her early years she lived and attended school in Florida but spent summers in Michigan.  After graduation from high school in Eustis, Florida in 1937 she took a year off then attended Florida State College for Women where she graduated in 1942 with a BA degree in Music.  She married Donald Harrison Lowell on July 17, 1942.

After living in various places in the Midwest after WWII, the family settled in Wacousta in 1952.  Jean and Don raised seven children – James Russell, Thomas Edward, Sarah Anne, Linda Jean, Katherine Ruth, Betty Lucinda and Donald Carey.  During the 1950s she also taught music at the Wacousta school and continued to serve as a substitute teacher in the Grand Ledge system into the 1970s.  She was very involved with the Methodist church in Wacousta, leading the choir and playing the organ when needed.  She was also active in the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union and other church organizations.

Jean spent the rest of her life in Wacousta.  She was diagnosed with cancer in July, 1976.  Always cheerful, she fought the disease with good diet and a positive attitude.  She died in California, where she had traveled for treatment, on November 1, 1977.

Jean Daniells Lowell about six months before her death.

Jean Daniells Lowell about six months before her death.

 

 

Jean Daniells Lowell

Jean Daniells Lowell

Jean takes a photograph

Jean takes a photograph

Jean plays a recorder.

Jean plays a recorder.

Don Lowell and Jean with kitty.

Don Lowell and Jean with kitty.

Don and Jean Lowell

Don and Jean Lowell

Jean Daniells and Don Lowell Wedding

Jean Daniells and Don Lowell Wedding

Iva Daniells welcomes Don and Jean Lowell home from their honeymoon.

Jean's mother Iva Bliss Daniells welcomes Jean and Don Lowell home after their honeymoon.


The Daniells Sisters: the Senior Years

October 23, 2009
Today we conclude the group pictures of the five Daniells sisters with snapshots of their senior years.  The sisters remained close all their lives, helping one another, consoling one another, and loving one another.  Every gathering of the five was another opportunity for a group picture.
Betty, Eleanor, and Mary at the cottage.

Betty, Eleanor, and Mary at the cottage.

Dora, Mary, and Betty gaze up at an oil portrait of their Uncle Estee Daniells.

Dora, Mary, and Betty gaze up at an oil portrait of their Uncle Estee Daniells.

Eleanor and Betty contemplate fallen apples at the cottage.

Eleanor and Betty contemplate fallen apples at the cottage.

Jean, Dora, and Mary front row.  Betty and Eleanor back row.

Jean, Dora, and Mary front row. Betty and Eleanor back row.

Jean, Eleanor, Betty, Mary, and Dora.

Jean, Eleanor, Betty, Mary, and Dora.

The sisters gather for Dora and John Panchik's wedding.

The sisters gather for Dora and John Panchik's wedding.

Jean, Mary, Dora, Betty, and Eleanor.

Jean, Mary, Dora, Betty, and Eleanor.

Mary sings while Eleanor plays the piano, 1952.

Mary sings while Eleanor plays the piano, 1952.


The Daniells Sisters: Pictures of the Middle Years

October 21, 2009

We continue with pictures of the teen and young adult years of the Daniells sisters.

Betty, Mary, and Eleanor

Betty, Mary, and Eleanor

Left to right, Eleanor, Dora, Jean, Betty, and Mary

Left to right, Eleanor, Dora, Jean, Betty, and Mary

Left to right, Jean, Betty, Dora, Mary, and Eleanor

Left to right, Jean, Betty, Dora, Mary, and Eleanor

Daniells sisters, 1932

Daniells sisters, 1932

Jean and Eleanor in their band uniforms.

Jean and Eleanor in their band uniforms.

Mary and Betty, 1928

Mary and Betty, 1928

Jean, W.C., Mary, and Dora with Mary's twins Mary and Donna.

Jean, W.C., Mary, and Dora with Mary's twins Mary and Donna.

Front row left to right, Eleanor, W.C. and Jean.  Back row, Mary, Dora, and Betty.

Front row left to right, Eleanor, W.C. and Jean. Back row, Mary, Dora, and Betty.

Betty, Iva, Mary, Dora, Jean, and Eleanor with Mary's twins Donna and Mary.

Betty, Iva, Mary, Dora, Jean, and Eleanor with Mary's twins Donna and Mary.


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